Lodgepole pine development after early spacing in the Blue Mountains of Oregon
Read Online
Share

Lodgepole pine development after early spacing in the Blue Mountains of Oregon by P. H. Cochran

  • 285 Want to read
  • ·
  • 2 Currently reading

Published by U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Research Station in [Portland, Or.] .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Lodgepole pine.

Book details:

Edition Notes

StatementP. H. Cochran and Walter G. Dahms.
SeriesResearch paper PNW -- RP-503., Research paper PNW -- 503.
ContributionsDahms, Walter G.
The Physical Object
Pagination24 p. :
Number of Pages24
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL17697032M

Download Lodgepole pine development after early spacing in the Blue Mountains of Oregon

PDF EPUB FB2 MOBI RTF

A ponderosa pine-lodgepole pine spacing study in central Oregon: results after 20 years. Res. Pap. PNW-RP Portland, OR: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Research Station. 14p. The growth response after 20 years from an initial spacing study established in a. Lodgepole pine forests are an important landscape feature in the western parts of North America. They grow in shallow, rocky soils, and do no require much rainfall. except jack pine (Pinus banksiana), lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta), and balsam fir (Abies balsamea). Jack pine is a relatively small, short-lived, early successional tree occurring in the eastern and central parts of taiga east of the Rocky Mountains. Lodgepole pine is a longer-lived, early successional species growing in western Canada. Title. A ponderosa pine-lodgepole pine spacing study in central Oregon: results after 20 years / Related Titles. Related/Analytical: A Ponderosa pine lodgepole pine spacing study in central Oregon. Series: Research paper PNW ; By. Seidel, Kenneth W.

TECHNICAL REPORT Ministry of Forests Forest Science Program A Summary of Early Results from Recent Lodgepole Pine Thinning Experiments in the British. Guidelines for Spacing of Lodgepole Pine Background: The current large outbreak of mountain pine beetle is unprecedented in the history of the province. This widescale infestation is killing vast areas of mature and overmature lodgepole pine in most areas of the central interior. Estimates. Population Size. Score 0 - Large: Generally >, individuals.. Range Extent. Score 0 - Widespread species within Montana (occurs in 5% or more of the state or generally occurring in 6 or more sub-basins.) as well as outside of Montana.. Area of Occupancy. Score 0 - High: Occurs in >25 Subwatersheds (6th Code HUC’s).. Environmental Specificity. Score 0 - Low: Species is a generalist .   Oregon's only native two-needle pine, Pinus contorta, commonly called lodgepole pine, is widely distributed across the state in a variety of diverse ecological habitats, from windswept ocean shores to mountaintops. Pinus contorta is named for its gnarled, twisted shape in its seashore habitat or, perhaps, the gentle twist in its paired needles. Three named forms in Oregon have been treated as.

Notes on Taxonomy and Nomenclature Top of page. P. contorta is a 2-needled pine of the subgenus Pinus (distinguished by having much resin, close-grained wood, sheath of leaf cluster persistent and two vascular bundles in each needle), section Pinus, subsection Contortae, along with the North American species P. banksiana, P. virginiana and P. clausa (Little and Critchfield, ). Mountain pine beetle selection of dwarf mistletoe and comandra blister rust infected lodgepole pine [mi Lumber recovery from insect-killed lodgepole pine in the northern Rocky Mountains [microform] / Marlin Lodgepole pine development after early spacing in the Blue Mountains of Oregon [microform] / P. H. Cochr. Lodgepole pine development after. early spacing in the Blue Mountains of Oregon. USDA For. Serv. PNW-RP 24 p. book for British Columbia forests. Work. Pap. Lodgepole pine is commonly associated with meadows (Rundel et al. ). Although lodgepole pine has well developed water regulation mechanisms, it typically occupies areas with at least seasonally wet soils. Annual precipitation in the lodgepole pine zone averages from to mm (30 to 40 in) annually, mostly as snow.